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Smoking Rules Not a Problem in Macon

Friday, September 23rd, 2011

discount virginia cigarettesA five-month delay, some revision and a public hearing didn’t change the debate over proposed tighter smoking rules in Macon. The open debate, held before about 100 onlookers in City Council chambers Thursday evening, came down to health vs. freedom — or at least that’s how opposing sides framed their own positions.

Only half a dozen of the council’s 15 members were on hand to hear the discussion. After a previous version of a smoking ordinance drew a mayoral veto in May, council members promised a public hearing before submitting a revised version.

The proposed ordinance, which has not yet been sent to a council committee for discussion, essentially would ban smoking in all bars and restaurants. It loosens a few restrictions from the earlier version, such as allowing smoking Virginia cigarettes in public parks except near playgrounds and crowded seating areas.

Most of Thursday’s debate centered on the bar and restaurant restriction. Council President Pro Tempore Larry Schlesinger, presiding over the hearing, began with a presentation from Greg

Dent, president of Community Health Works, which is sponsoring a Breathe Easy Macon campaign; and Lora Hawk, the group’s campaign manager.

Dent said a survey conducted in March found that 70 percent of local residents favor a law against smoking in establishments that serve the public.

“We were very, very surprised by the survey results,” he said. “To be honest with you, we didn’t expect it to come back so high in favor of smoking restrictions.”

Hawk said the proposed ordinance is similar to those already in force in Athens and Savannah, and many other cities nationwide. “Numerous studies” show those rules have no negative impact on business, and enforcement is rarely a problem, she said.

“The current proposal makes all workplaces smoke-free,” including private clubs, Hawk said. “It doesn’t prohibit smoking, it just asks them to step outside.”

She urged its passage countywide, not just in Macon.

Sam Hart, chairman of the Bibb County Commission — and a Community Health Works board member — listened from the back of the room. He didn’t speak at the time, but he later commented that the county will wait and see how the ordinance fares in the city before considering it in the county.

“OK, now it’s your turn,” Schlesinger said, turning to the crowd.

Downtown Grill owner Richie Jones asked for an exception for cigar bars, such as the one he operates there. He’s got money tied up in the humidor and ventilation system and has out-of-town customers who visit specifically to relax there, he said.

David Corr, former Libertarian candidate for City Council, said he’s a lifelong nonsmoker and has lost his mother and friends to smoking. But he opposes the ordinance on civil liberties grounds.

“Using this logic, you could ban people from eating more than one Big Mac a week,” he said, comparing smoking rules to a Nazi “police state.”

Deryl Dantzler, a professor at Mercer University’s law school, said she wouldn’t offer her opinion on the ordinance as a whole — but she asked for electronic cigarettes to be exempted. They don’t emit smoke but deliver a dose of nicotine.

She said she smoked for more than 50 years and couldn’t quit until she found e-cigarettes.

“If we’re concerned about smoke, we should also be concerned about the people who are trying to quit smoking,” Dantzler said. When she’d previously asked why e-cigarettes were not exempt, she was just told it was an “enforcement issue” because they resemble real cigarettes, she said. Dantzler held up several different e-cigarettes to show that many don’t look like cigarettes at all.

Element nightclub owner Phillip Sinclair and Fowl Play sports bar owner Joey Burtner criticized the survey, disputing its methods. Burtner said such a major issue should be decided by public referendum, not City Council.

David Cousino, the former Republican candidate for mayor who plans a write-in campaign this year, angrily denounced Community Health Works. He asked how much the group was putting into the anti-smoking campaign and asked where that money comes from.

Community Health Works representatives made no response at the time. Asked later, Dent said the group’s financial information is posted on its website.

The IRS Form 990 for 2010 shows $1.9 million in “contributions and grants,” but individual contributors are not listed. The audit for the same year, also posted on its site, lists $62,000 in unspecified direct donations and $549,000 in “other contributed support,” but the bulk of Community Health Works’ funding comes from other health-related agencies including the Georgia Cancer Coalition and the state Department of Community Health.
Victor Stanley, a smoker and owner of the Hummingbird nightclub, said his name “sort of got put on the top of the banner for both sides.”

He supports a smoking ordinance — but not right now, he said. Athens can afford it because its bars and restaurants have enough traffic to offset any loss, but Macon businesses struggle to draw crowds, Stanley said.

“You can’t ask us to lose what little business we have right now,” he said. “Let’s get that problem fixed, and the smoking ordinance will take care of itself.”

Tobacco Displays Can’t Influence Youth to Start Smoking Habit

Wednesday, September 14th, 2011

best quality virginia cigarettesIn-store tobacco displays can make young people more susceptible to taking up smoking Virginia cigarettes in the future, according to a new study.

Research conducted by the University of Stirling, with support from Cancer Research UK, showed that children who find behind-the-counter tobacco displays eye-catching or attractive are more likely to develop the habit.

Anne Marie Mackintosh, lead researcher at the university, suggested that this is due to the colourful and brightly-lit nature of these displays, which she said was a “real concern”.

The survey of 950 non-smoking 11 to 16 year olds also showed a high level of support for incoming laws to remove these fixtures from shops, with more than 70 percent of respondents speaking in favour of such measures.

Jean King, Cancer Research UK’s director of tobacco control, said: “This research adds further evidence showing that putting tobacco out of sight is without a doubt the right move to make.”

Earlier this month, a separate study from the research charity suggested that unbranded, plain packaging for cigarettes will also help to make them less attractive.

Victoria Faces Drop in Smoking Rate

Tuesday, September 6th, 2011

buy virginia cigarettesIt seems that the long running chants of reducing smoking rate have been finally heard as it has been confirmed that in Victoria, smoking rate has gone down by over 25%.

It was found after a team from Cancer Council questioned nearly 4,500 people over the phone and found that over only 15% are smoking Virginia cigarettes on regular basis as if now against 21% around 13 years ago, though it’s being linked with increase in tobacco products.

Though it sends a fresh wave in the contours of society, the Chief Executive of the Cancer Council of Victoria, Todd Harper, thinks the other way around.

“I think the declines that we’ve seen over the last few years are really a combination of tax increases and of social marketing campaigns of smoke-free environments”, Harper said.

There is no second thought that smoking has range of health issues attached, but it takes a lot to bring exemplary changes in the global health issue.

It’s being believed that corroborative pressure from range of factors, including pressure from government bodies and other volunteer organization makes it feasible for the smoking rate to reach a new low.

Not even this, such reports act as a source of inspiration for many other groups to take strategic steps towards eradicating the scar of smoking.

Addiction to Cigarettes, Women Smokers

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2011

discount virginia cigarette onlineMore WA women are contracting lung cancer as experts warn of a significant rise in new cases of the disease, which kills about 320 women every year in the State.

Lung cancer remains the deadliest cancer among men and women aged under 75 and new figures published yesterday show 803 deaths and 976 new lung cancer cases in WA in 2009.

The WA Cancer Registry’s report reveals that while there had been a steady decline in lung cancer among men in recent years, new cases among WA women were increasing more than 4 per cent a year.

The report also projected the number of all cancer cases would rise almost 50 per cent in WA over this decade, from 10,805 in 2009 to 15,421 in 2019.

Report author Tim Threlfall said that despite anti-smoking campaigns, a decline in smoking Virginia cigarettes and a drop in male lung cancer, more women were getting the disease.

“It’s still less common than in males but to some extent that is because heavy smoking is less common in females,” he said. “It certainly is a concern, but it’s an ongoing concern and just a sign of an ongoing problem.

“Maybe because it’s more historically a male issue, women haven’t thought too seriously about it.”

The report shows the number of all cancer cases and cancer deaths increased in 2009 from the previous year. Men got the disease more than women, developing 58 per cent of cancers in WA in 2009.

Almost 400 women were diagnosed with lung cancer in WA in 2009, 1313 were diagnosed with breast cancer, 545 with bowel cancer and 400 with melanoma.

Lung cancer killed 483 WA men in 2009, prostate cancer led to the deaths of 255 and bowel cancer killed 228. The rise in prostate cancer cases continued with the diagnosis of 2030 new cases in 2009, a 5.4 per cent increase.

Lung cancer generally has a poor prognosis and current trends of new cases reflect smoking behaviour 20 to 30 years ago.

Susan Rooney, from the Cancer Council of WA, said it was difficult to pinpoint why more women were being diagnosed with lung cancer but it was hoped that falling smoking rates would lead to fewer lung cancer cases.

“It’s probably that lag effect. More men used to smoke, then women did and that’s started to catch up with them,” she said.

The report found skin cancer was still a significant risk for people aged 15 to 39. Melanoma was the third most common new cancer among men and women in 2009, with 643 men and 400 women diagnosed with the disease

Doctors Call for Severe Enforcement of Anti-Smoking Law

Wednesday, June 1st, 2011

cheap virginia cigarettes onlineDespite the Control of Smoking and Consumption of Tobacco Product Law, many Burmese don’t obey the law which should be strictly enforced, says the Myanmar Burma Doctors’ Association (MDA). The law establishes no-smoking zones in Burma, but many smokers ignore the law. The law also bans the sale of Virginia cigarettes singly or in a package containing less than 20, but many vendors and shops do not follow the law.

‘Some Institutions have banned smoking in some areas, but government departments have not established no-smoking zones’, Dr. Khin Soe Win, the MDA general-secretary told Mizzima.

The law declares non-smoking areas in hospital buildings, clinics, stadiums and education buildings.

The law came into effect on May 4, 2007.

World No Tobacco Day was May 31. The World Health Organization’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control is the theme of this year’s observation.

According to the WHO Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS), the prevalence of smoking among teenagers in Burma was 10.2 per cent in 2001 and 4.9 percent in 2007.

The MDA estimated that at least 10 percent of teenagers smoke.

According to the GYTX survey, despite a significant reduction in the proportion of teenagers smoking cigarettes, the use of other tobacco products had increased from 5.7 percent in 2001 to 14.1 percent in 2007.

‘I want to urge the people who usually chew betel quid not to use tobacco products in their betel quid if possible’, said a doctor in Rangoon.

Not only ordinary people but also many health officials and workers in Burma smoke, said Khin Soe Win.

‘We have educated the public in many ways. But, people often ignore the warnings. Even doctors smoke. Some of them have had serious heart attacks, but they have not quit smoking’, he said.

Cigarette smoke contains around 4,300 chemicals; the most dangerous is nicotine. Other substances are carbon monoxide, benzene and ammonia.

A Rangoon doctor said: “My father-in-law died of lung cancer. He knew that it was the consequence of smoking. One of his sons also died of lung cancer recently. Another son has suffered from tongue cancer as a result of smoking. Although he knows the disease is a consequence of smoking, he still smokes sometimes’.

Dr. Khine So Win said, ‘The most serious diseases are cancers, especially lung cancer and mouth and tongue cancers. Other types of damage include blood clotting, arterial problems and stomach damage’.

The MDA has urged the government to take legal action in accordance with the laws.

What should be done?

“Without enforcement, laws and rules are useless’, said Khine Soe Win. ‘To sell alcohol, you need to have a license but to sell cigars, cigarettes and cheroots, you don’t need to have a license. If cigarettes sellers need licenses, there can be some restrictions. And if the authorities introduce a higher tax on tobacco products, the number of the smokers may be reduced. Plus, the authorities need to prevent importing cheap cigarettes form border areas’.

In the 20th century, tobacco has killed an estimated 100 million people worldwide and it could kill one billion during 21st century, according to WHO.

Khine Soe Win said that the government should use more media to educate the public about the consequences of smoking.

‘The government should educate the public via multimedia, especially using a combination of pictures and sound, I think. Now the state-run TV stations sometimes broadcast programs to educate the public about the adverse consequences of smoking. But most of these programs are broadcasted at times when people hardly watch TV’, Khine Soe Win said.

Indoor Tobacco Control in China

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011

cheap virginia cigarettesChina’s indoor smoking ban at public venues, which took effect on Sunday, seems to have failed to ignite action against Virginia cigarettes. The ban issued by the Ministry of Health applies to places such as hotels, restaurants, bars and public transportation.

Given that no specific penalties or responsibility for enforcement have been set out in the legislation, Jiang Yuan, deputy director of the National Office of Tobacco Control, said the new ban “could hardly work well”.

She urged authorities to enforce the ban and clearly define penalties for violators.

In Beijing, a special force is expected to enforce the ban, Li Yajing, a division director of the Beijing health bureau, told the Beijing News.

Currently, the mainland has more than 300 million smokers, statistics from the World Health Organization show, and about 1.2 million people die from smoking-related diseases every year, accounting for one-fifth of the world’s total.

Meanwhile, an estimated 740 million people are exposed to secondhand smoke, mostly in places like restaurants, bars and workplaces, statistics from the Ministry of Health show.

“The ban, if well implemented, will effectively protect nonsmokers from smoking,” said Wu Yiqun, deputy director of the ThinkTank Research Center for Health Development, a Beijing-based non-governmental organization that promotes smoking control.

Katherine Heigl Switched Electronic Cigarette

Wednesday, March 16th, 2011

buy virginia  cigsMost smokers use them as a means to finally giving up Virginia cigarettes. But nine months after switching from the real deal to electronic ones, Katherine Heigl is still puffing away on hers. The actress was spotted out for dinner in Los Angeles with her husband Josh Kelley, where she sucked on her silver ‘smokestik’ in the crowded restaurant.

The couple left baby Naleigh, two, at home to dine at upmarket Japanese restaurant Matsuhisa. Katherine wore a beige knit jumper and a black maxi skirt with gold sparkly wedge heels and a blue scarf for their date.

Katherine, 32, has been vocal in her struggle to quit smoking over the years, and turned to the electronic device after failing to quit after adopting daughter Naleigh in 2009.

The 27 Dresses star was first pictured sucking on the smoketick ‘Hindu Elite’ last July on the set of her film One For The Money.
She discussed the quit smoking aid during an appearance on David Letterman ion September, when she showed the late night host how to smoke her customised ‘bejewelled’ version.

Describing her efforts to give up the unhealthy habit, Katherine said: ‘You start once a week, maybe with a cocktail with friends at a bar, and then you buy your first pack during a really stressful break-up, and then it’s downhill from there.’

‘I’ve tried everything. I’ve tried the patch, I’ve tried the gum, I’ve done Chantix, twice, which made me bananas (a prescription medicine used as a quit smoking aid).’

The electronic cigarette uses water vapour and liquid nicotine. It is legal to use inside as the water vapour breathed out by users is harmless to others.
As far back as 2008, Katherine was publicly discussing her battle with quitting after attracting negative press when she was constantly pictured smoking.
She told the Washington Post at the time how she started. She said: ‘It’s so stupid. I started when I was like 22 or 23.

‘I had my first cigarette at a bar one night, and I was like “Mmm. I’ll try this. I can have just one. I am not gonna get addicted.
‘Then you start bumming. I’m bumming. I don’t buy my own packs. I’m not addicted.’

Katherine is back in Los Angeles after filming her part in the ensemble comedy New Year’s Eve in New York last month.

The actress stepped in at the last minute to replace Halle Berry after she pulled out to concentrate on her custody battle with Gabriel Aubry.
However, the issues were resolved and Halle was able to take part in the film after all, in a different role.

The rom-com, directed by Garry Marshall, stars a host of big names, including Sarah Jessica Parker, Jessica Biel, Robert De Niro, Ashton Kutcher, Lea Michele and Zac Efron.

Hilary Swank, Michelle Pfeiffer, John Stamos, Sofia Vergara and Abigail Breslin also appear in the movie, slated for release in December.